About your Search

20120925
20121003
STATION
MSNBCW 12
CNN 9
CNNW 9
MSNBC 8
CSPAN2 5
CSPAN 3
CNBC 1
FBC 1
KPIX (CBS) 1
KQED (PBS) 1
WETA 1
WMPT (PBS) 1
WRC (NBC) 1
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 69
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 69 (some duplicates have been removed)
is in decline. researchers at the australian institute of marine science say the reef has lost half of its coral cover over the past 27 years. there are multiple causes, including a destructive kind of starfish shown here. we look at what's behind it and what's at stake-- in australia and around the world-- with nancy knowlton, a coral reef biologist and a chair of marine science at the smithsonian national museum of natural history here in washington. welcome. >> thanks. how has all of this coral died off? do we know what's causing it? is it all that... >> it's not all the star fish. the star fish is about 42%. typhoons, big strong storms another 48% and then coral bleaching is the remaining 10% which is caused whenever the water gets too hot. >> ifill: so this is human causedded? >> yes. most of it is human caused. i mean a coral reef naturally goes through cycles of up and down. but it shouldn't be declining by half over course of 27 years. >> ifill: i feel like we have talked before about the declining coral cover. but not... but i'm wondering whether it's now picking up speed or whether thi
, first of all, the kind of science that you do for a living. you basically find out what we as people can handle when it comes to drama and exposure to these kind of horrifying, you know, events. there were crash test dummies in a lot of these seats. they were very expensive, weren't they? >> there are, about $150,000 uninstrumented. the data acquisition system needed to collect the data, all of that. we had probably at least, probably about 500,000 plus worth of instrumentation on that plane. >> you wanted to know every single ounce of data. every single knee that would get skinned on an airplane. >> exactly. because this isn't something we do every day. >> '84 was the last time you did it. >> we wanted to collect as much information as possible. and that was what was great about discovery. they allowed us to do that. they viewed this as a science experiment. >> now everybody wants to know where should i sit on an airplane? we've all heard the lore you'll die if you're in first class, you're better to be in the middle, no, the tail, then you see all of these different kind of crashes. >>
guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. it's just common sense. the wheels of progress haven't been very active lately. but because of business people like you, things are beginning to get rolling. and regions is here to help. making it easier with the expertise and service to keep those wheels turning. from business loans to cash management, we want to be your partner moving forward. so switch to regions. and let's get going. together. woman: what do you mean, homeowners insurance doesn't cover floods? [ heart rate increases ] man: a few inches of water caused all this? [ heart rate increases ] woman #2: but i don't even live near the water. what you don't know about flood insurance may shock you -- including the fact that a preferred risk policy starts as low as $129 a year. for an agent, call the number that appears on your screen. >>> we're back in tonight's outer circle where we reach out to our sources around the world and we begin in athens where demonstrators clashed with police. te
in the science they studied in school. and they take a live and let live attitude toward other people in this country. they don't want a big churchy government telling them how to live. so if the democrats are smart, even reasonable, they will make the biggest grab in history for the people that the new right-wing party is leaving behind, as it shifts further and further, leaving a legacy of barry goldwater and ronald reagan behind. democrats, pay attention. this is your chance to build a party back up to that grand coalition of the new deal and new frontier years. why on earth wouldn't you? >>> that's "hardball" for now. thanks for being with us. "the ed show" with ed schultz starts right now. >>> good evening, americans, and welcome to "the ed show" from new york. 41 days until the 2012 election and only seven days until the first presidential debate. mitt romney is telling nbc news, the race is tied. really? well, tonight we'll reintroduce the romney campaign to the concept of arithmetic. this is "the ed show," let's get to work. >> president obama and i both care about poor and mi
of the human mind would shock you. >> host: thank you so much. the secret science of winning campaigns is provocative and playing the groundwork for things to come. thank you for doing this. are you doing this going forward? >> i am reporting for slate. especially right teeing about the nuts and bolts. it is a fun time i will be out on election day. >> we will hear about it when the election is over. >> guest: thank you for having me. >> let me start tonight to ask you come at you focus on nine women per know-how do so let them? >> -- how did you select them? we could have done more but with the confine of the book you could only do so much. democrats, republicans, diff erent ages. we knew on the basis of nine you could not make generalizations that were 100% certain. conclusions were hypotheses that other people run with. in order to make that hypothesis we needed a diverse group. >> we also included women that was the white house project so several with men that the white house project identified olympia snowe, kathleen sebelius sebelius, they want to consider the notion with her
to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. c'mon0manp just do it,quick.ú no one's watchingp you0have to if you want to hang with0us ♪musicú the other one tooú good job >> welcome back. we continue with donald trump. i look at the world situation. you deal with the economy i look at the world burning in middle east and islamists and greece and spain and decline of the you euro. 16 trillion in debt. 6 trillion under obama alone. i am worried. i am really really worried about america and the future and lack of leadership at a very important time. what's your worst fear? >> i am worried also. that's one of the reasons i am so involved. i don't need to do this. i don't love doing it. you are a great friend and a friend of mine in the true sense. i would rather be doing other things right now. it's late. you work all day long. you come and shawn is going to interview. >> thanks a lot. >> the truth is or watching you because i always do. >> the truth is i am worried about this country. this country is going in the wr
unprepared we are. good to see you. hacking a computer isn't rocket science. getting to the level of the white house is noteworthy. >>guest: will, they went into the military office, that is the one responsible for keeping america's nuclear launch codes. they could compromise those, we would be in a real world of hurt. you are right, they have gotten so far. part of the reason is because attackers normally have an advantage. that element is, for years we have been afraid to acknowledge that the chinese have been behind unprecedented series of attacks not only for espionage but also to try all sorts of other things. if we are not willing to have the honest conversations with the chinese and with ourselves, of course we can't do very much to protect american networks. >>neil: but we are afraid of the chinese they own so much our debt. companies want to be often their good side and expanding to china, so, we just turn the other cheek? >>guest: we can't. this is now gotten to a whole new level. it is worrisome because of the nuclear launch codes and this is the president, the presiden
'm not going to stand for this. she's against everything we teach here. learning education science et cetera. all of a sudden, michele bachmann. oh no! i love it!
the health of the air they breathe and what they eat. these people believe in the science they studied in school. and they take a live and let ve attitudtoward oer pe ihi un thon't want a big churchy government telling them how to live. so if the democrats are smart, even reasonable, they will make the biggest grab in history for the people that the new right-
to other developed countries. the u.s. ranks 14th in reading, 17th in science and 25th in math. how to fix the education system was front and center in chicago this month as teachers walked off the job over issues of longer school days, merit pay and teacher evaluations. education reform is an issue in the presidential campaign. president obama and his republican challenger, mitt romney, both favor expanding charter schools, support standardized tests and want more accountability from teachers and principals. but the two men have significant disagreements. >> i think some of the main differences between governor romney and president obama when it comes to education come in the area of school choice. governor romney sees a really robust rule for school choice and school improvement whereas president obama like a lot of democrats has been skeptical of vouchers. >> reporter: romney supports taking federal dollars for educating special needs and low income families, known as title i funds and giving them directly to parents in the form of vouchers. although romney avoids using that word. >> fo
they breathe and what they eat. these people believe in the science they studied in school. people in this country. they don't want a big churchy government telling them how to live. so if the democrats are smart, even reasonable, they will make e biggest grab in history for the people that the new right-wing party is leaving behindas it shifts further and further, leaving a leg
. the science writer and columnist for discover magazine will look at the cyberworld popular culture and computer networking and politics. lives in their october 7 at noon eastern on c-span2 book tv. up next, a debate between kendis to be the next governor of new hampshire. the republican candidates unsuccessfully ran for governor in 1996 and was the republican nominee for the u.s. senate in 2010. democrat is a former new hampshire state senator who served as the majority leader. this took place in manchester, new hampshire and comes to us from new hampshire public broadcasting and is about an hour. >> welcome to the candidates' forum on business and the economy. i am most of the exchange. we are coming to you from the television studios at the new hampshire is to to the politics that political library. for the next hour we will hear from new hampshire is gubernatorial candidates. we will press them to talk about what they would do as governor and refrain from spending valuable time attacking each other. and now let me introduce our candid it's. they are republican ovide lamontagne a
's a symptom of the disease. governor romney, he knows about as much about science as anybody i know. he's educated. he's got a degree in harvard in law, in business. he could do a little studying about climate change and understand it's a real challenge. and yet he just plays this know-nothing view of i don't know anything about that stuff. he does. >> he kind of reminds me of john boehner trying to preside over that house caucus of people who are fire breathing and wants the first thing to be done to be banning abortion. romney understand he's a passenger in this vehicle. the hard right is driving this car and he's just trying to manage the issues, trying to manage the chaos. i think people saying that it's romney kind of miss the point. this is a party that has moved so far to the right that i'm not sure jeb bush or chris christie or any of the other ones could have managed it any better because the problem is the actual party itself has really moved off of center and they've gone to far right. and they don't -- not enough people identify with that. when they look at themselves in tha
, medicare, they care about good health care and want to do a good job of what they eat and the science they studied in school and and they don't want a big chunky government telling them how to live. so if the democrats are smart, even reasonable, they will make the biggest grab in history for the people that the new right wing party is leaving behind as it shifts further and further leaving the legacy of barry goldwater and ronald reagan behind. democrats, pay attention. this is your chance to build a party back up to that grand coalition of the new deal in new frontier years. why on earth, wouldn't you? and that's "hardball" for now. thanks for being with us. "politicsnation" with al sharpton starts right now. >>> thanks chris and thanks to you for tuning in. tonight's lead, they are losing it. and it's not just mitt romney. the evidence is growing that republicans have a much bigger problem on their hands than any one candidate, even the candidate for the white house. instead, we're seeing a rejection of the entire world view. your on your own philosophy that says, if you're down on
things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >> bill: campaign 2012 segment tonight. go to political guy scott rasmussen and dr. larry sabato have been listening to the first three blocks of the factor. scott joins us from asbury park, new jersey doctor from washington. your tracking poll has the race tied. if you believe all the news reports today the president is way ahead in ohio, florida and other swing states. what's the truth? >> the way i see it, the race is close. it is not a blowout. it's certainly not over. but there is a big difference between saying well, the president is not far ahead and saying mitt romney is going to do just fine. right now the numbers show that mitt romney is trailing. and our polls in florida by point -- florida by 2 points and ohio by a point. he does have some ground to make up but very little. >> i want to be very very clear here. in the rasmussen poll in florida, the president is up by 2, not 10. 2. >> correct. >> bill: and ohio n. ohio the president is up by 1. both within a margin of error a dead
straightforward guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> and in the big finish tonight, the red state of arizona could be changing colors. new polling from purple strategies shows mitt romney with only a three-point lead over president obama. back in 2008, the obama campaign thought they had a shot at arizona if senator john mccain had not been on the top of the ticket. there is also a open senate seat in the state of arizona that is now in play. outgoing republican senator jon kyl's seat could be turning from red to blue. the republican candidate for senate is congressman jeff flake. he leads democrat challenger richard carmona by only one point in a carmona campaign internal poll. now, congressman flake is a typical republican in speaker boehner's failing house of representatives. he wants to repeal obama care, the affordable care act, he's against same-sex marriage, he's against a woman's light to choose, and the icing on the cake, he voted for paul ryan's, what some people call, immoral budge
, science, reading and so forth and don't want to take chinese and mandarin it is okay. do i get that right? >> absolutely, yes. it's okay. >> having heard that, what's your beef? >> my beef is less about, on that a particular point. if you actually read the governor's article it is well written. the last paragraph you have to embrace and love but it is the arrogance that somehow we, in government, are smart enough with our crystal ball to see what the future is. i remember in the '80s, when i was signing up for grad school they wanted me to speak japanese because remember in the '80s, the japanese economy was going to rule the world. it's trying to let government sort of choose winners and losers and predict the future. how do you do -- hopefully where the governor will actually go is providing to give the students the choice. >> i don't think it is actually picking winners or losers when you say this is a language spoken by a billion people around the world. people who speak japanese today, by the way, have a good leg up. it is still an important part of our global economy. >> governor, t
. dante scala is a professor of political science at the university of new hampshire, and "the washington post" deputy political editor, anne kornblut stuck around too. dante, you're on the ground there in the granite state. you're very familiar with that electorate. latest nbc news/marist poll, likely voters, president obama 51%, mitt romney 44%. what's the likelihood that the governor is able to close that gap between now and the first tuesday in november? >> i think it's going to take, craig, a national rebound for mitt romney to make it competitive here in new hampshire. there's no evidence that despite the fact that governor romney has campaigned in new hampshire off and on, really for most of the past decade, there's no evidence that he owns any kind of specific backyard advantage here in this new england state. his favorables to unfavorables are -- his unfavorables outweigh his favorables here in the state, which is striking given the amount of time he spent campaigning here. so new hampshire really is behaving the way it did four years ago, as a democratic-leaning bellwether state
and science teachers. we need that to move forward as a country. >> that's a total, though, right? >> educating -- training two million new workers in our community colleges in conjunction with business to fill jobs that are open right now. boosting american manufacturing by ending the tax break that sends jobs overseas and giving tax incentives to companies that start manufacturing businesses here. these are specific tangible proposals and, candy, i believe that they will pass because i believe the american people are supportive of that. >> but they haven't passed. >> it will be rendered on november 6 wrth. >> no, they haven't. >> for two years jobs -- >> some of the specific proposals haven't, but, candy, think about the logical extension of what you're saying. what you're saying is so we select the other guy because he will implement the proposals of the republican congress has pushed to cut taxes by $5 trillion skewed to the wealthy, can't pay for it. that will add burdens to the middle class to slash education, to slash research and development. >> i'm not suggesting -- >> he
. proposals in tv ads and on the stump like a million new manufacturing jobs, 100,000 new math and science teachers. feel mores a operational than an actual detailed plan. given the fact there's hunger for change, what change can the incumbent promise? the president has to come up with a good enough explanation of how reelecting him would break the partisan fever in washington. what does romney have to deal with? he hasn't differentiated from george bush's. and his plans lack specifics. in a one-on-one debate, candidates have a lot of control over how aggressive they are. both romney and the president are inexperienced in a one-on-one debate format. few details on the format. the president and romney will be at podiums, standing, not sitting, and there will be no basic time limits on their answers. it's not 90 seconds, buzzer, things like that. it's up to the discretion of the moderator, jim leierer. that's going to be up to him. but there's supposed to be a lot of leeway here over how long the conversations go. the debate is on domestic policy. 90 minutes is supposed to be devoted to the
in science or medicine and will now be relegated to quackery. >>> and everybody's talking about arnold schwarzenegger's new book and how he had an affair with more than just the housekeeper. he chieted with actress bridget nielsen while living with maria shriver. >> you don't feel bad about it, you just write it. >> actually, i did feel bad about it. but all my various things were just mistakes. you know, my failure, my screwups. >> was that the only affair? >> no. i had others. but, you know, that's something that's obviously between marie and me. >> and we will hear from him in our next half hour. speaking of arnold, if you read only one thing this morning, i highly recommend janet maslin's review of his book. an autobiography of someone as mast master conniver. one thing you can depend on is that these will come together. delicious and wholesome. some combinations were just meant to be. tomato soup from campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. begins with back pain and a choice. take advil, and maybe have to take up to four in a day. or take aleve, which can relieve pain all day w
of state for political affairs. political science professor at norfolk state university will focus on the role of virginia in the election and a history of the african-american vote in virginia. we will also be joined by editor in chief of the washington monthly to discuss recent articles in the magazine examining the consumer financial protection bureau. live on c-span every day at 7:00 a.m. eastern. >> i watched c-span every time, especially when i really pay attention the most. any time something is going on i want to watch c-span because they typically have the best, most unbiased view of whatever is happening. if i want to get spun in a circle of watch one of the other news organizations. i love c-span. watch on tv, on line. if something's going on now want to know what's happening al west and to c-span. don't know that i have a favorite show. for me it is always just anytime i need to know what's going on i know that c-span will have the real story of what's been happening. >> jeff trick watch is c-span on direct tv, created by america's cable companies in 1979, brought to yo
right by medical science, is really critical for achieving health and preventing these diseases. so the green new deal is a win/win win because it gets us to clean energy which can stop the climate crisis, jump start our economy, creating three times as many jobs as every dollar spent in the fossil fuel economy, and it puts us back to work. so it's a win/win win all around. host: dawn, joining us from oxford, alabama with dr. jill stein, last call. good morning to you. caller: good morning. i kind of agree with an awful lot of what you said about the cause of all this. but the one thing that you admitted and i'm cureuse about, what would -- kaoeurous about, what would make a banker with the subprime mortgage, what would make him -- which the whole goal is to make money, as much as he can, what would make a banker loan money to somebody that he knows was not going to be able to pay him back? and then do they just think -- get a meeting and say we're going to create these instances where we're going to loan money for people to buyouts, paopl that can't pay it back and sell it to someb
't mind sharing a little political science secret with you. although the debates routinely draw large viewing audiences, evidence shows that voters do learn a little bit of information from them, but political scientists also tend to agree that debates don't actually make a difference in the outcome. sorry. it's at least statistically true. most often, you can accurately predict where a race will end up after the debates by knowing where things stood before the debates. but don't tell the candidates. because with the first presidential debate coming up wednesday, governor romney and president obama will be gearing up for a fight. that's a good thing. we still need the debates. it's a so krat i can sem nor of sorts for the country having the candidates stand behind their podiums forced to answer for nair proposals. we get to see how the ideas stand up under questioning before you decide. at least for some of us, before we vote. here with me today is msnbc c contributor for the blog. latino.com's victoria did he francesco soto. she's a fellow at the university of texas. jam al simpsons
. there are different flavors all come down to science. commercial tomatoes have been scientifically bred to be inexpensive, easy to ship and avail scrabble all year round. nothing wrong with that says this tomato researcher. >> it's an economical crop. part of the reason is the farmer wants maximum yield out of his field. so we have a lot to thank the industry for for developing these. and nobody at that point expected it would have anything to do with the flavor of the fruit when they are ripened. >> reporter: at her lab, powell discovered hybrid commercial tomatoes no longer carry one gene found in heir looms. without it they produce less sugar. in our instant test one off the shelf tomato had just half the sugar. >> 5.5. >> reporter: of the heir loom tomato. sue fwar is only one reason that heirlooms may taste better. >> it smells so good. >> reporter: where and how they are grown counts for a lot. >> tomatoes you get at the supermarket, they look perfect. this one doesn't look perfect. >> to me it looks perfect. >> reporter: these garden variety tomatoes are anything but average to t
cyber networks and systems safe. we have a strong science and technology directorate that has worked cooperatively to develop tests and transition deployable cyber solutions and technology. among its many projects, it is leading efforts to develop more secure internet protocol to protect consumers and industry. because each member of the public plays an important role in cyber security, which sponsored a campaign which is a year-round effort designed to engage and challenged americans to join the effort to practice and promote safe on-line practices. we want good cyber habits to be as ingrained and as familiar as putting on your seat belt. if you are not already a friend of the campaign, i encourage you to join today. in a few days, we will kick off national cyber security awareness month which is an opportunity each october to emphasize the culture of shared responsibility necessary to maintain a safe, secure, and resilient cyber environment. we must work internationally because the cyber criminals do not respect traditional national boundaries. attacks can and do to emanate from an
proposals. i'm asking -- >> 100,000 new math and science teachers. we need that. >> that's a goal, right? >> educating training 2 million new workers in our community colleges in conjunction with business to fill jobs that are open right now. boosting american manufacturing by ending the tax break that sends jobs overseas and giving tax incentives to companies that start manufacturing businesses here. these are specific tangible proposals and i believe they will pass because i believe the american people are supportive of that. >> but they haven't passed. >> the verdict will be rendered november 6. megyn: joining me now mark hannah, former aid to john kerry and barack obama. kevin, your chots on that exchange? >> that was a revealing look inside the best talking points that president obama has by his top spokesperson on the campaign frame beside himself. if you can't get more prekay tough than education, green energy, research and development, and that's the solutions? those are the pin points for solutions you are offering for an election that's going to be decided on an economy and job
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 69 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)